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 Sound De-coupling

Acoustic. Vibration Decoupling

Noise is transmitted through solid surfaces by vibration. When one solid vibrating surface is in physical contact with another surface it causes the second surface to vibrate too. In the form of vibrations, noise can easily travel from machinery along pipes and through walls.

Vibration decoupling is the process of introducing flexible, visco-elastic, materials between two solid surfaces. As the first surface vibrates the decoupling material can compress against the second solid surface - effectively stopping the vibration from passing through.


 

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        <i class="icon-chevron-right"> What is acoustic bridging?
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        <p>Acoustic bridging, also known as “flanking”, is the name given to the processes by which noise bypasses an otherwise effective sound control system as structure borne vibration. These vibrations can then excite sources outside the sound control enclosure. </p>
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        <i class="icon-chevron-right"> Will vibration decoupling stop acoustic bridging/flanking?
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        <p>Yes. Appropriate vibration decoupling stops the noise from moving freely through an acoustic bridge – reducing the noise that can pass through.</p>
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        <p>Visco-elastic foams are good for preventing the passage of vibrations since they can compress and then return to their original shape without allowing the vibrations to pass through.</p>
<p>For heavier applications however visco-elastic foams might be crushed. Where this is likely to be the case the foams will no longer provide effective vibration decoupling. In such circumstances metal springs can be used to achieve a similar effect. </p>
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Noise breakout can undermine even the best acoustic insulation

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Kaimann FAQ: Sound Decoupling

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